Planning officers recommend go-ahead for Silton Wind Turbines

Coming to a hillside near you?

A North Dorset Planning Case Officer, one James Lytton-Travers, has recommended that the application to build four 120-metre wind turbines at Silton, be approved.

The North Dorset Planning Committee meeting will be on March 1st at the RiversMeet leisure centre, Gillingham. Obviously they are expecting a full turn out.

In his report, Mr Lytton-Travers acknowledges that the turbines will have an adverse effect on the landscape, but says this is outweighed by the benefits these structures will bring.

In particular,  “The potential  to contribute significantly to renewable energy targets and to reduce CO2 emissions and climate change”.

Potential be dammed – what about actual?

If the wind doesn’t blow enough, the whole thing will be an expensive and unsightly white elephant, subsidsed by you and me. Last year, according to the Department of the Environment, wind turbines produced only a meagre 26 per cent of their potential output, and calculations here suggest the performance of the Silton Four will be around 22 per cent.

The builders, landowners and developers of this project will make a tidy sum, thanks to generous public (that’s you and me) subsidies.

Will our elected representatives see sense and vote this expensive, wasteful and quixotic project down?
Think. if it happens here, where next? Stourhead? Melbury? Bulbarrow? Eggardon?

We shall see.

More on
http://www.saveoursilton.org/
www.dorsetforyou.com

Tell us what you think -Ed

It seems the question has been answered. No sooner did we publish this post then a proposal was announced to build a wind farm comprising about 250 450ft tall turbines across a 76 square mile area of the English Channel off the coast of Dorset. 

Enough to power some 820,000 homes. So we won’t need the miserable contribution from the Silton Four -ED

Gordon Sunderland -a tragic and uneccessary end?

The death recently occurred of a much respected and loved Half Moon regular, Gordon Sunderland. His funeral at Yeovil attracted a massive turn-out on Monday 14 February. Probably the cleverest person in the bar (and that’s saying something!), he was a former senior  boffin at Plessey and  a top man in the MOD at Portland. A very distinguished scientist, gentleman, raconteur and inbiber. We miss him.

We send our sincere condolences to his two daughters and their families.

His sad demise at the age of only 74 raises some serious concerns. This is what happened.

One night in November last year he felt unwell. So unwell, he called an ambulance.

When they arrived, he was upstairs, in bed (he lived alone).

The ambulance crew refused to enter the premises, although he shouted down to them.

Impasse.

So he eventually and reluctantly agreed to come downstairs. In doing so, he fell, and broke his ankle. The ambulance crew carted him off to hospital In Yeovil.

Since the accident he was in and out of hospital in Verrington, Yeovil and latterly Exeter, where he was waiting to have a skin graft, and, possibly the amputation of his foot, a daunting and frightening prospect.

He died in Exeter of a heart attack on January 31st, just before his operation.

On the face of it there is a clear chain of events between his initial call for an ambulance and his untimely death. We hope that the authorities launch an enquiry and review their procedures and rules.

Many people live alone in the country. Some get ill. They will probably think twice before calling an ambulance.

If anyone who knew Gordon well would like to write a fuller appreciation of his life and work, please get in touch -Ed

So you think you’re insured?

As Horsington couple discovered to their horror that they had never been insured, as their house was close to a stream

A cautionary tale from a Horsington couple.

A leaking oil tank is everyone’s nightmare. Especially when the authorities treat the accidental perpetrators like mass murderers, at least at the outset. A large bill for the over-the top-clean-up for even a modest spillage like this is guaranteed, but not to worry, it’s all covered by insurance. Or is it?

A well-known 3-letter insurance company (motto: re-defining standards – and how!) insured the couple.
They were surprised to discover that not only did the insurance company refuse the claim, but that they had never been insured. Why? Because their house was within a quarter of a mile of a watercourse*. The company has gallantly offered to repay their premiums from the start of insurance.

There is now a big fight going on, but in the meantime the rest of Horsington and South Cheriton had better check their policies. Most of the houses in both villages are close to a stream. And beware of buying insurance on line.

* Not 25 metres, as stated in an earlier edition.

Our new gardening column – introducing Silas Silage

Horsington Blog - Silas Silage
Silas Silage

 Spring is a-comin’ in, writes Silas Silage, our very own gardening expert, who believes planning is the key to gardening success.

With the evenings lengthening and old cock robin a’ busy in the hedgerows while Mr Worm starts his perennial task of digging out from his hibernation hideaway, spring is in the air and  it’s time to think about the garden. The edge of the lawn is a carpet of snowdrops and bluebells, and the crocuses and daffodils delight the eye, waving in the gentle spring breeze while aloft, tits, pigeons and song thrushes start their mating rituals. (Get on with it –Ed)

There are so many things to do in the garden at this time of year, so I always starts with a list.

I go down to the shed and unlock it after the long winter, teasing the hinges with a drop of 3 in-one.

Then I sits down in the old armchair, roll a cigarette of Old Shagger’s Knotweed Vanilla Gold, pour a measure of sloe gin and gets out me notepad.

First on the list is a pencil sharpener, and a new pencil too for good measure. This one is down to the last……..
(To be continued – Ed)

Slow death of the Library?

Wincanton library seems safe from the cuts – for the moment. As an economy, the opening hours have been reduced so that anyone with a job, or at school will be unable to use it without difficulty and inconvenience.
The inevitable consequence of this will be that library usage will reduce, enabling the Faceless Ones in County Hall to say that owing to lack of demand, the library will close. Perfect!